Collections

Greater than X kb: A quantitative assessment of preservation conditions on genomic DNA quality, and a proposed standard for genome-quality DNA

Posted July 8, 2016 - 3:29pm

Mulcahy DG, Macdonald III KS, Brady SG, Meyer C, Barker KB, Coddington J. (2016) Greater than X kb: A quantitative assessment of preservation conditions on genomic DNA quality, and a proposed standard for genome-quality DNA. PeerJ Preprints 4:e2202v1 https://doi.org/10.7287/peerj.preprints.2202v1

Surveying the Sumacs and Mosses of North America

I am a Museum Specialist in the Department of Botany and the research assistant to curator Jun Wen, whose expertise includes grapes – the plant family Vitaceae, ginseng – the plant family Araliaceae, cherries – the family Rosaceae, and many plant groups found both in eastern Asian and North American...

Preventive Medicine Unit Supports Smithsonian Museum in Djibouti Africa

Posted April 26, 2016 - 1:03pm

DJIBOUTI, Africa (NNS) -- A preventive medicine team from Navy Environmental and Preventive Medicine Unit 7 in Rota, Spain, spent two weeks chasing insects across the desert in Djibouti as part of an ecological survey of Camp Lemonnier. EPMU-7 team members... participated in the bug chase at Camp Lemonnier and surrounding areas that was led by scientists from the Smithsonian Museum of Natural History, Feb. 10-26... Read full article here: http://www.navy.mil/submit/display.asp?story_id=94033

What's that Genome in the Sand?

Wild animals that are directly visible in their environment are the main attraction for nature lovers. Most people do not know about the existence of a fascinating hidden world of animals that inhabit marine sand. This sand can host an impressive abundance and diversity of microscopic animals known as “meiofauna.”...

Field work in South Africa in Dec 2015

Posted March 21, 2016 - 2:51pm

Field work in South Africa in Dec 2015
18 March 2016

Finally, several months delayed is a post about my recent field work in South Africa that took place in December 2015. I put together my tweets from the field and they can be accessed at this storify story.

The resident bird gets the butterfly.

When you look around you might notice birds going about their daily business. But what are they up to? American redstarts are migratory birds that travel to Jamaica during the winter and potentially compete with resident birds, like the Yellow Warbler, for food. Photo by Dave Inman. CC By-NC-ND 2.0...

Cryptobiotic Condos—How Genomics Helps Monitor Coral Reefs

The following is a blogpost about an expedition sponsored by the Smithsonian's Global Genome Initiative. There’s more to reefs than fishes and coral, far more. In fact, it is estimated fishes and coral make up less than 1% of all reef-associated animal species. The other 99% of reef diversity –...

GGI-Gardens

GGI-Gardens Team at WorkGGI-Gardens Team at Work

The Global Genome Initiative (GGI) was founded with the goal of collecting and preserving genome-quality tissue samples from at least one species belonging to each family and 50% of the genera of species on Earth. For the diverse plant branch of the tree of life, GGI–Gardens was founded to collect and preserve these specimens from arboreta, botanic gardens, and greenhouses.

In January 2015 the GGI-Gardens established a collaboration to sample vascular plants from the mid-Atlantic region of the United States that included five partner gardens (Smithsonian Gardens and Department of Botany Greenhouse, US Botanic Garden, US National Arboretum and the USDA Germplasm Farm).

During a 10-week summer collection effort two interns and a Smithsonian staff member were able to collect 158 families, 450 genera and 754 species. Sampling followed plant phenology and standard herbarium practice and was practiced throughout the summer flowering season with priority given to flowering or fruiting individuals. Collections were vouchered (traditional herbarium specimens) and photographed and leaf material was preserved in both liquid nitrogen and silica gel.

Collecting is continuing in the greenhouses throughout winter 2015 and spring 2016. March-April 2016 will usher in a significant increase in the numbers collected and their diversity while spring plants come into bloom.

Even given its initial “pilot” scale, GGI-Gardens is a cost effective and high impact project. Furthermore, it can easily be scaled to international adoption by partner gardens. The GGI–Gardens program would not exist without it’s partners, who play a vital role in collections, strategic sampling goals, and expanding the global network of arboreta, gardens, and greenhouses. Living collections at botanic gardens around the world contain an incredible amount of plant diversity – let’s preserve it together!

2017 Summer GGI-Gardens Internship Opportunity

Resources

Where Does Your Seafood Come From?

Providing the world’s growing population with a sustainable and secure supply of seafood is a daunting task. Illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing is one of the biggest threats to global fisheries. IUU fishing in the Caribbean accounts for a large proportion of the spiny lobster and queen conch fisheries,...

Collecting asiloid flies for genomic research

Posted November 25, 2015 - 12:36pm

I have collected flies for my research for almost 20 years now and over the past 15 preserved specimens for.....

http://nmnh.typepad.com/asiloidflies/2015/11/collecting-asiloid-flies-for-genomic-research.html

 

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