GGI Blog

An Interview with an Orchid Specialist.

The Global Genome Initiative’s-Gardens team spent the cooler months of January, February, and March within the expansive, climate-controlled confines of the Smithsonian Gardens greenhouses in Suitland, Maryland. We worked primarily with facilities manager, Vickie DiBella; horticulturalist, Matthew Fleming; and orchid collection specialist, Tom Mirenda. Our goal was to collect as...

Surveying the Sumacs and Mosses of North America

I am a Museum Specialist in the Department of Botany and the research assistant to curator Jun Wen, whose expertise includes grapes – the plant family Vitaceae, ginseng – the plant family Araliaceae, cherries – the family Rosaceae, and many plant groups found both in eastern Asian and North American...

What's that Genome in the Sand?

Wild animals that are directly visible in their environment are the main attraction for nature lovers. Most people do not know about the existence of a fascinating hidden world of animals that inhabit marine sand. This sand can host an impressive abundance and diversity of microscopic animals known as “meiofauna.”...

Field work in South Africa in Dec 2015

Posted March 21, 2016 - 2:51pm

Field work in South Africa in Dec 2015
18 March 2016

Finally, several months delayed is a post about my recent field work in South Africa that took place in December 2015. I put together my tweets from the field and they can be accessed at this storify story.

The resident bird gets the butterfly.

When you look around you might notice birds going about their daily business. But what are they up to? American redstarts are migratory birds that travel to Jamaica during the winter and potentially compete with resident birds, like the Yellow Warbler, for food. Photo by Dave Inman. CC By-NC-ND 2.0...

Cryptobiotic Condos—How Genomics Helps Monitor Coral Reefs

The following is a blogpost about an expedition sponsored by the Smithsonian's Global Genome Initiative. There’s more to reefs than fishes and coral, far more. In fact, it is estimated fishes and coral make up less than 1% of all reef-associated animal species. The other 99% of reef diversity –...

Where Does Your Seafood Come From?

Providing the world’s growing population with a sustainable and secure supply of seafood is a daunting task. Illegal, unreported, and unregulated (IUU) fishing is one of the biggest threats to global fisheries. IUU fishing in the Caribbean accounts for a large proportion of the spiny lobster and queen conch fisheries,...

Collecting asiloid flies for genomic research

Posted November 25, 2015 - 12:36pm

I have collected flies for my research for almost 20 years now and over the past 15 preserved specimens for.....

http://nmnh.typepad.com/asiloidflies/2015/11/collecting-asiloid-flies-for-genomic-research.html

 

An Entomologist, Arachnologist, and Illustrator Walk into the woods

Posted June 22, 2015 - 12:00am

Well, it was actually several entomologists, and together this group conducted a two-day, BioBlitz-style, sampling of Southern Appalachian terrestrial (living on land) invertebrates for genomic preservation! Read on for details from one of our first GGI collecting expeditions!

Preserving and Understanding the genomic diversity of life on Earth

Posted May 21, 2015 - 12:00am

An introduction to the Global Genome Initiative from its Director, Jonathan A. Coddington.

http://nmnh.typepad.com/100years/2015/05/preserving-and-understanding-the-genomic-diversity-of-life-on-earth.html

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